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Learn how to light a fire and keep it going

Instructions that may help in lighting a fire and keeping it going

(for dummies)

The do's and dont's of Firelighting

Every good fire appreciated

Below are the instructions of a friend and trainee fire guru. I appreciate his generic view but I would like to add specific information regarding our bakers oven and fireplace. A good firebox it is! and comes from New Zealand.

I’ll add my comments where they are needed though I think he has done a pretty good job:

First, there are two vent levers. One at the top pulls upwards and connects the heat flow between both chambers. You need to have this up if you wish to utilise both boxes and down, its normal operating position, if you want to only have heat from the top box.

The second vent is at the front bottom of the door and is circular. Spin anti-clockwise to open and clockwise to close.

1. Ensure that the stove firebox is not full of ash – remove ash if necessary using a suitable metal container. Hopefully, you will not have to do that as we try and have the fire ready to go. In winter, if it is not already alight, then we would have it ready to go. Just light a match and watch it burn. It’s the only bit of instant gratification we are in favour of.

2. Open the bottom air vent of the stove and open the flue damper if you have one. No. Only open the top lever after the fire has been started and is beginning to ramp up some heat. By opening the front air vent you allow more air to be sucked in and so the fire should start more easily and burn more readily.

  • 3. Tear single pages of a newspaper in half and then scrunch them into smallish balls. Place the paper balls in a circle in the centre of the firebox, in a circle large enough to cover about a half of the base of the firebox. (Some people use firelighters but you may not even need them!) Otherwise, wrap one up in the paper for a more assured event.

4. Now, make sure you have all the right pieces of dry wood you need before you light the fire. (read through the steps below and then gather your wood). Good advice and usually you won’t need to go much further than the back shed.

5. First up you will need some kindling, that is, small pieces of dry wood and sticks, thin and about 10 -15 cm long. Softwoods are best. Lay around 6 small pieces on top of the newspaper in different directions – a bit like the game pickup sticks. Remember that the idea is that air and flames should be able to get to each piece of wood. Now lay a few larger pieces of soft/lightish wood that are standing up-it should look like a tee-pee shape. Make sure the round vent is fully open and the top vent is pushed down.

  1. Light the newspaper in 2-3 places at the bottom and when they have caught alight you can close the door of the stove – although don’t close it fully with the handle just yet – just let the door lean gently on the frame. You want the fire to get very hot, because this will allow you to have some great hot coals burning away at the bottom of your fire (hopefully right through the night!). No short cut either. Good wood has to burn for a while before hot coals are available.

7. Once the wood has caught alight and the fire is going well you can put some larger pieces of wood into the firebox. Place them gently on top of the fire, in the tee-pee shape – this helps to prevent the problem of smothering the fire by placing the logs over the fire in a way that stops the air and flames getting to all the pieces of wood in the fire. Now that your fire is burning well, you can close the door fully. I concur (again): make sure the flames can breath. The hotter the fire the less flame and the more hot coals.

8. Do not fill the firebox with wood, maybe burn around 3-4 largish pieces of wood at a time. At this stage if your fire is going really well, you can close the vents a little, but keep an eye on your fire because you want to maintain good flames and don’t want the fire to smoulder. You can close the vent when the fire is really raging.  ditto but fill the box to its limit so long as you have good spaces between them or the fire is very hot with mainly coals. Fire also favours burning up and under a piece of aerated timber. You don’t want the fire to either smolder due to too many sealing off air-flow or, too much air and good wood wasted in heat you probably don’t want. ;At this point you can regulate the air vent on how warm you want the room to be.

9. Keep the really heavy, hardwood pieces until last. When you are thinking about heading off to bed, you may want to put your one or two large, heavy, hardwood pieces on the fire so they can burn through the night. Make sure they are alight on their underside before you head off to bed. The front vent should almost be closed, the top vent should have always been closed unless you were baking, and the red hot coals should be glowing under lightly packed, hardwood cuts.

  1. A good fire is a joy to behold.

 

 

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Farm Gate Festival

The Lost World is an evocative name and it doesn’t disappoint.. There is stunning
mountain scenery along the tourist drive but did you ever feel like turning in past the
farm gate to explore more?
Well the Inaugural “Farm Gate Festival” in The Lost World is your chance to do just that!
This festival will be on June 28th and is an opening event for the Scenic Rim Region’s
‘Eat Local Week’. www.eatlocalweek.com.au
All participating businesses along the Lost World tourist drive are opening their doors to
the public. This is your chance to enter the Farm Gate and try, buy, learn, taste and
explore everything on offer.
Buy fresh meat and produce direct from the farmer, tour a dairy farm, ride a horse, enter
an art space and buy direct from the artist, try a cooking class or simply relax in a cafe
or picnic by a pretty river.
It couldn’t be easier to get involved just visit www.farmgatefestival.org to see what’s on
offer and download your map and guide.
This is your opportunity to be a local in The Lost World. It’s Your “backstage pass” to
our area – so join in the adventure!
When is it?: Saturday June 28th 2014
Where is it?: In The Lost World which is part of The Scenic Rim region and 90 minutes
from Brisbane and The Gold Coast, 20 minutes south of Beaudesert.
Media Contact: Nathan Overell – 0422 587 567 or info@farmgatefestival.org

Farm Gate Festival

Farm Gate Festival in the Lost World

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Revegetation Summer Review

  We’re proud of the tree plantings and weeding on Wongari near Christmas Creek, just three kilometers to walks in the Lamington National Park, in the shadow of Buchanan’s Fort, and stretching up Waterfall Creek to Lamington Falls situated in …
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Darlington Markets

              The Darlington Markets are held in the grounds of the Darlington State School. It is in the Scenic Rim and another one of its many attractions. Found just at the end of Kerry …
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Serenity Cabin Photo Gallery

Serenity Cabin

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Wongari Flora and Fauna Photo Gallery

Wongari Flora and Fauna

3 wedgetail eagles
3 wedgetail eagles
Cane toad
Cane toad
Beetle mania
Beetle mania
Bovine curiousity
Bovine curiousity
Diamond python
Diamond python
Frog
Frog
Eastern Yellow Robin
Eastern Yellow Robin
Lace monitor
Lace monitor
Pretty Face Wallaby
Pretty Face Wallaby
Speckeled Monarch
Speckeled Monarch
Stripped Burrowing Frog
Stripped Burrowing Frog
Tangle trees
Tangle trees
Wedgetail Eagle
Wedgetail Eagle
White Necked Heron
White Necked Heron
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Guest View Photo Gallery

Wwoofers We've Had

overseas travelers we've had

Ben French
Ben French
Edwidge and Mathieu
Edwidge and Mathieu
Jesper
Jesper
Edwidge
Edwidge
tobi julie simon nils
tobi julie simon nils
Oola Mark Sven
Oola Mark Sven
sven jesper oola
sven jesper oola
Tobi Simon Julie Nils
Tobi Simon Julie Nils
Vincent
Vincent
Tobi and Nils
Tobi and Nils
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Buchanans Fort Photo Gallery

Buchanans Fort

photos from above

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Stinsons Crash Site Photo Gallery

Stinsons Crash Site

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Rehabilitation Photo Gallery

Rehabilitation

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